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Attorneys representing some 12,000 mentally ill inmates filed a motion Tuesday asking a federal judge to require Illinois Department of Corrections enforce a 2015 settlement agreement reached in the case of Rasho v. Baldwin. 


 

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Thousands of Illinois inmates are asking a federal judge to take action and help resolve a “human rights disaster” they say is taking place inside state prisons.
Attorneys representing some 12,000 mentally ill inmates filed a motion Tuesday asking a federal judge to require Illinois Department of Corrections enforce a 2015 settlement agreement reached in the case of Rasho v. Baldwin.
In their motion, attorneys from three legal organizations – Equip for Equality, Uptown People’s Law Center and Dentons – claim IDOC hasn’t held up its end of that agreement, which required it to establish “a mental health system to facilitate timely, consistent, and individualized treatment.”
The class-action suit began in 2007 after attorneys claimed treatment of mentally ill patients within Illinois’ correctional facilities had devolved to the level of “cruel and unusual punishment.” They say Ashoor Rasho, whose name appears on the lawsuit as its lead plaintiff, had been isolated and restrained inside the Pontiac Correctional Center instead of receiving the necessary treatment for his depression and auditory hallucinations.
“If we stopped right now then the case would have been 10 years of work down the drain, because we still don’t have a functional and meaningful mental health treatment system,” Equip for Equality attorney Andrea Antholt said. “These are human beings, these are fathers and brothers and mothers and sisters and they need help.
“We have people being physically injured, emotionally injured – real life harm to real life people – and that shouldn’t be acceptable to anyone.”

Read the full motion here.
Attorneys mention the case of one inmate, referred to only using the pseudonym “Henry,” who began suffering from depression and hearing voices while in isolation at another Illinois prison. Following a failed suicide attempt in June, Henry spent the next three months placed on “crisis watch” inside a stripped-down cell without his “clothes or property.”
“During that three-month crisis placement, his treatment plan was never updated,” attorneys in the motion state. “Other than seeing the psychiatrist once, Henry received no mental health treatment while on crisis watches. The only interaction he had was a daily check-in by a mental health professional for a few minutes at his cell door.”
The initial suit dragged on for nearly a decade before the sides reached an agreement in December 2015. While IDOC has since made some changes – such as expanding staff training and constructing new mental health facilities – this week’s motion claims the department hasn’t implemented several of the required remedies.
A federal-appointed compliance monitor wrote in a May 2017 report that IDOC had “considerably improved” the quality of its mental health services. But he also noted “tremendous problems” persisting within prison psychiatric services, and found the department was noncompliant in several areas, including treatment planning and suicide prevention.
In a follow-up memo published last week, the same monitor referenced IDOC’s “continuing emergency” caused by a lack of psychiatric services for mentally ill inmates.
“I must reiterate that IDOC is in a state of emergency regarding its provisions of psychiatric care,” the monitor wrote.
Antholt said some of the noncompliance issues are rooted in staff vacancy issues. The settlement itself didn’t require IDOC to budget out new positions, rather it asks the department to fill existing spots that have gone unfilled.
Alan Mills, executive director of the Uptown People’s Law Center, said the department has also fallen behind on basic medication management and has a standing backlog of more than 2,000 psychiatric appointments.
“This is not sort of a theoretical, constitutional thing that they ought to be doing,” he said. “People are desperately suffering in there … We have a human rights disaster inside of our prisons right now.”
IDOC has already outlined its plan to cut that backlog down significantly by the end of the year. It has also expanded the time available to hold psychiatric appointments, authorizing employee overtime and additional clinics to be run during second shifts and weekends……http://chicagotonight.wttw.com/2017/10/11/attorneys-idoc-inmate-psychiatric-care-state-emergency#.WeRcsO3ubGw.twitter

 

 

“The agency,” she said, “stands by its record.”
Follow Matt Masterson on Twitter: @ByMattMasterson

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Andrew Rawlins: Prison mental health care criticised after inmate suicide

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Andrew Rawlins had struggled with mental health problems from an early age, his family said
The sister of a prison inmate who took his own life just 48 hours after being remanded in HMP Bristol says she “has no faith in the system”.
Andrew Rawlins, a father-of-one from Clevedon, had struggled with mental health problems from an early age.
His sister Katrina said he should have been cared for in a mental health unit rather than remanded in custody.
Avon and Wiltshire Mental Health Partnership NHS Trust said it was to review the way inmates are monitored.
Mr Rawlins was on bail over an alleged assault when he was arrested for walking naked to a supermarket and sent to prison.
His sister had tried and failed to have him sectioned, and said of the prison service: “They don’t help people who are ill really.”
Anxiety and distress
The 26-year-old was one of five prison inmates who killed themselves at HMP Bristol last year – the second highest number of any prison in England and Wales.
A record number of inmates took their own lives in prisons in England and Wales in 2016, the Ministry of Justice recorded.
It said there were 119 self-inflicted deaths – 29 more than the previous year and the highest number since records began in 1978.
The Howard League for Penal Reform said prison suicides had reached “epidemic proportions”.
Mr Rawlins was living with his sister and her partner Tom Turner in May last year when the couple became alarmed at his behaviour.
Ms Rawlins told BBC Inside Out West: “He started sending threatening messages to me, Tom and a few other family members. Just sort of lashing out at us all the time really.”
She was also concerned because he was using cannabis and had threatened to kill himself several times.
The couple called a mental health helpline and were told the quickest way to get him sectioned was to call the police.
“Nothing whatsoever was being done for him,” said Mr Turner.

Image caption
Katrina Rawlins said people who are mentally ill should be in hospital, not prison
“We were being passed backwards and forwards from the police and the mental health service saying ‘well if he’s using cannabis we’re not going to go near him’.”
Then one morning in July, the couple said he smoked “a large amount” of the drug before undressing and walking naked to a local supermarket.
After failing to obtain any help from mental health services, the couple called the police and he was arrested.
Mr Turner said: “We didn’t want him arrested but we had to get something done and that was our only option.
“They say to trust the system, but I’m sorry to say after all this I have zero respect for the way things are working with the mental health side of things.”
The arrest put Mr Rawlins in breach of bail conditions and he was remanded in custody at HMP Bristol.
Within 48 hours he had hanged himself. The inquest into his death found he had taken his own life whilst suffering extreme anxiety and distress.
Ms Rawlins said: “I have no faith in the system. People who are mentally ill shouldn’t be in prison, they should be in hospital.”
In another high-profile case, Callum Smith, 27, from Cheltenham was found hanged in his cell at HMP Bristol in March 2016.

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Cullum Smith Family
Image caption
Callum Smith, 27, from Cheltenham was found hanged in his cell at HMP Bristol last year
He had a history of mental illness and was “paranoid and delusional” when he was remanded after threatening to burn down his mother’s house.
An inquest found his suicide was contributed to by a number of inadequacies and failings by the prison service while he was in custody…..http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-bristol-41415242?platform=hootsuite


 

 

A new report from Disability Rights New York, the federal watchdog for people with disabilities in the state, found rampant abuse and neglect within the mental health treatment unit at the Attica Correctional Facility.

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Entrance of the Attica Correctional Facility (Photo by Jayu) A new report from Disability Rights New York, the federal watchdog for people with disabilities in the state, found rampant abuse and neglect within the mental health treatment unit at the Attica Correctional Facility. Under state law, people with diagnosed serious mental illness, who face punitive […]

via — Moorbey’z Blog

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“Santa Clara County Sheriff Laurie Smith called his “brutal murder” in the Santa Clara County Main Jail at the Hands of Three Jail Guards.”: Victim wrote poetry, had ‘the best smile,’ but struggled with bipolar disorder

Santa Clara County Sheriff Laurie Smith called his “brutal murder” in the Santa Clara County Main Jail at the Hands of Three Jail Guards.

Posted by curi56 on September 4, 2015

Victim wrote poetry, had ‘the best smile,’ but struggled with bipolar disorder

Julia Prodis Sulek
jsulek@mercurynews.com
Posted:   09/03/2015 12:27:34 PM PDT3 Comments | Updated:

Friends, family stand by Santa Clara County jail guards accused of killing inmate
The political background of the case against the three Santa Clara County jailers
Replay: Press conference on arrests of 3 Santa Clara County correctional officers
Quick arrests in Santa Clara County jail death indicates strong evidence, experts say
Mercury News editorial: Santa Clara County arrests in jail murder reassure public
Santa Clara County sheriff condemns 3 correctional officers booked on murder in jail beating death
Sep 2:
San Jose: Dead inmate’s injuries appear to be result of blunt force trauma
Sep 1:
San Jose: Sheriff investigating whether officers played role in inmate’s death, sources say
Aug 29:
San Jose: Inmate found dead in Main Jail North
SAN JOSE — Michael Tyree wrote poetry, kept a journal and tried for years to manage his bipolar disorder.

He hoped for a life of peace, his girlfriend from his teenage years in Florida remembers. But his life spiraled downward in recent years and ended with what Santa Clara County Sheriff Laurie Smith called his “brutal murder” in the Santa Clara County Main Jail at the hands of three jail guards.

In an extraordinarily rare case, all three guards* were arrested Thursday, accused of beating the slim 31-year-old man to death in a cell on the sixth floor of the jail. *i would name them cowards, not guards

Tyree’s sisters were reluctant to speak publicly Thursday. One extended relative who didn’t want her name used would say only that “Michael had a very hard life. He had a very sad life.” …

please, read more. http://www.mercurynews.com/crime-courts/ci_28752850/san-jose-inmate-death-victim-wrote-poetry-had

“MOTHER´S PLEA: “Kris was extremely decompensated had to be taken hancuffed, shackled on a wheelchair to the Mental Unit which is very far to where visitation is and they bring them walking under extreme heat”.

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February 29, 2016

Gemma Pena Noguer FACEBOOK
26. August um 23:28 ·

Thank you LORD . Thank you everyone. Kris was extremely decompensated had to be taken hancuffed, shackled on a wheelchair to the Mental Unit which is very far to where visitation is and they bring them walking under extreme heat. He was given an Emergency Treatment shot and according to his counselor he was sleeping. According to Mrs. Englert he probably was due for his shot and that might be the reason of it, huh? I wonder if due to the lockdown he was not given is Meds on time. Of course DOC is very well known for not documenting lets say appropriately. No news on him today.
Thank you. PLEASE CONTINUE THE PRAYERS FOR MY ENTIRE FAMILY. GOD BLESS YOU ALL.

Losing direction: The abysmal history of mental health care at Pelican Bay State Prison —


Losing direction: The abysmal history of mental health care at Pelican Bay State Prison — Moorbey’z Blog | Colouredjustice Blog
curi56May 31, 2017

 

 

by Mariposa McCall From 2010-2011, while working as a contract psychiatrist for the California Department of Corrections and rehabilitation (CDCr) providing supportive therapy and medication management for San Quentin State Prison (SQSP) inmates, I was inspired by the resilience of the human spirit and reminded of our shared humanity. When I returned to CDCr in […]
via Losing direction: The abysmal history of mental health care at Pelican Bay State Prison — Moorbey’z Blog

“Losing direction: The abysmal history of mental health care at Pelican Bay State Prison — Moorbey’z Blog | Colouredjustice Blog”

URGENT PRAYERS FOR Kristopher Rodriguez. HE IS GOING THRU A MENTAL CRISIS RIGHT NOW

URGENT PRAYERS FOR Kristopher Rodriguez.
HE IS GOING THRU A MENTAL CRISIS RIGHT NOW. AS I CAME TO VISIT HIM.
PRAYERS.

GEMMA PENA ROGUE FACEBOOK

 

 

Parents Catch FBI in Plot to Force Mentally Ill Son to Be a Right Wing Terrorist

Parents Catch FBI in Plot to Force Mentally Ill Son to Be a Right Wing Terrorist

TOPICS:False FlagFBIMatt AgoristTerrorism

 

August 17, 2017
By Matt Agorist
It’s become a near-weekly occurrence. Somewhere in some state, the FBI will announce that they’ve foiled yet another terrorist plot and saved lives. However, as the data shows, the majority of these cases involve psychologically diminished patsies who’ve been entirely groomed, armed, and entrapped by FBI agents. Simply put, the FBI manufactures terror threats and then takes credit for stopping them.
While many of these cases have garnered attention and been exposed in the alternative media, a recent case out of Oklahoma sets a new low for FBI and exposes how insidious these plots can be.
Through the hundreds of ‘foiled terror plots’ the FBI has ‘busted’ over the years, many of them have been focused on people of Middle Eastern descent or people associated with ISIS or Al Qaeda. This time, in the case of Jerry Drake Varnell, the 23-year-old diagnosed schizophrenic, accused of attempting to bomb a bank, the FBI fomented terror from a right wing dialogue.
In a June meeting with the agent, according to FBI documents, Varnell described himself as a believer in “Three Percenter” ideology, a right wing group claiming to be committed to standing against and exposing corruption and injustice.
According to federal documents, Varnell drove what he believed was a stolen van containing a 1,000-pound ammonium nitrate bomb on Saturday morning to blow up an Oklahoma City bank. Vile, indeed. http://activistpost.com/right-wing-terror.jpg

 

 

 

 

At the ADX Florence supermax prison in Colorado, the Department of Justice’s inspector general found mentally ill inmates held in solitary confinement despite a 2014 change in policy meant to improve their care

 

At the ADX Florence supermax prison in Colorado, the Department of Justice’s inspector general found mentally ill inmates held in solitary confinement despite a 2014 change in policy meant to improve their care. Brennan Linsley/Associated Press
Filed 6:29 p.m.
07.12.2017
News
Federal Watchdog Finds Mentally Ill Are Stuck in Solitary
A new report contradicts a claim from the Bureau of Prisons.
By Justin George

The U.S. Bureau of Prisons faced stinging criticism over its treatment of mentally ill prisoners Wednesday with the release of a federal watchdog report that found the agency locks some of its most troubled inmates in solitary confinement conditions for long stretches at a time.
The report by the Justice Department’s Office of Inspector General paints a picture of an agency ill-prepared to identify and tend to prisoners with mental illness despite a 2014 policy change that was supposed to boost care for those inmates.
Much of the report looked at conditions for the mentally ill in so-called Restrictive Housing Units, where the most difficult inmates are held.
The government investigation found the agency imprisons inmates in solitary conditions even though though it claims that it does not use solitary confinement.
“Although BOP states that it does not practice solitary confinement, or even recognize the term, we found inmates, including those with mental illness, who were housed in single-cell confinement for long periods of time, isolated from other inmates and with limited human contact,” the report states.
For example, at ADX Florence, a supermax facility that houses the federal system’s most dangerous inmates, federal investigators found two mentally ill inmates confined to individual cells for 22 hours a day. For the other two hours, they couldn’t engage with each other — or any other inmate.
Elsewhere, they found a man with mental illness who had been kept in a single cell for about four years, and another they said had “serious” issues who had spent nearly two decades in Florence before he was moved to a secure mental health treatment program.
At Florence, inmates with mental illnesses were found to be in isolating conditions for an average of 69 months. In contrast, many states limit such arrangements for those with mental illness to no more than 30 days, the report stated.
A Bureau of Prisons spokesman declined to comment on the report. In a response to a draft, Thomas Kane, the agency’s acting director, said the BOP would adopt all 15 of the Inspector General’s recommendations.
The Bureau of Prisons has long faced skepticism and scrutiny of its assertion that it does not use solitary confinement — including at a 2015 Senate hearing. Of about 154,000 inmates in federal custody, more than 10,000, or about 6 percent, are held in some form of restrictive housing, according to the agency.
Inspector General Michael Horowitz said the prison system doesn’t limit how long prisoners can be kept under such conditions or track how long they are there.
“This was particularly concerning given that the [Bureau of Prisons] recognizes that inmates’ mental health can deteriorate while in restrictive housing,” Horowitz said.
Inmates with mental illnesses spent disproportionately longer periods of time in restrictive housing than other inmates, the federal probe said.
Even at a most basic level, the bureau does not seem to know how much of its population is in need of mental treatment, the report said. The bureau has released various estimates that can be contradicted just months later by it own staff.
In 2015, for example, only 3 percent of the federal inmate population was receiving mental health treatment, even though an internal study estimated that 19 percent of inmates had a history of mental illness. At the same time, the agency’s chief psychiatrist estimated that 40 percent of the prison population has a mental illness.
In some cases, prison officials appeared to deliberately undercount prisoners with mental illness, the report said.
After the agency adopted a new policy in 2014 to better care for mentally ill inmates, the total number of prisoners receiving regular treatment fell by 30 percent. It fell by 60 percent for inmates with illnesses considered to be the most serious. The report alleged that prison officials may have reduced the number of inmates who need treatment because “they did not have the necessary staffing resources to meet the policy’s increased treatment standards.”
The problem does not just affect the prisons, the report said: Many of the prisoners are then released to their communities with serious, untreated problems. It is not known if any of them were re-arrested.

The Bureau of Prisons has not kept statistics on recidivism rates — another issue the Inspector General’s Office pointed out.

https://www.themarshallproject.org/2017/07/12/federal-watchdog-finds-mentally-ill-are-stuck-in-solitary?

You´ll find another Report about ADX Florence (5 y.o. article):

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2012/apr/10/abu-hamza-isolation-supermax-prison

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Losing direction: The abysmal history of mental health care at Pelican Bay State Prison — Moorbey’z Blog | Colouredjustice Blog

colouredjustice.wordpress.com

by Mariposa McCall From 2010-2011, while working as a contract psychiatrist for the California Department of Corrections and rehabilitation (CDCr) providing supportive therapy and medication management for San Quentin State Prison (SQSP) inmates, I was inspired by the resilience of the human spirit and reminded of our shared humanity. When I returned to CDCr in […]

via Losing direction: The abysmal history of mental health care at Pelican Bay State Prison — Moorbey’z Blog

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